Partenaires

CNRS


Rechercher


Accueil > Annuaire

Cadène Martine


email

Directrice de recherche, responsable du groupe : Spectrométrie de masse fonctionnelle des métastases

Publications

2018   Références trouvées : 2

Castro-Rodrigues A. F., Zhao Y., Fonseca F., Gabant G., Cadene M., Robertson G. A. and Morais-Cabral J.   (2018)

The interaction between the EAG potassium channel and the protein kinase CaMKII involves an extensive interface at the active site of the kinase.

J. Mol. Biol. 2018 Oct 28. pii : S0022-2836(18)30826-X
The Drosophila EAG (dEAG) potassium channel is the founding member of the superfamily of KNCH channels, which are involved in cardiac repolarization, neuronal excitability and cellular proliferation. In flies, dEAG is involved in regulation of neuron firing and assembles with CaMKII to form a complex implicated in memory formation. We have characterized the interaction between the kinase domain of CaMKII and a 53-residue fragment of the dEAG channel that includes a canonical CaMKII recognition sequence. Crystal structures together with biochemical/biophysical analysis show a substrate–kinase complex with an unusually tight and extensive interface that appears to be strengthened by phosphorylation of the channel fragment. Electrophysiological recordings show that catalytically active CaMKII is required to observe active dEAG channels. A previously identified phosphorylation site in the recognition sequence is not the substrate for this crucial kinase activity, but rather contributes importantly to the tight interaction of the kinase with the channel. The available data suggest that the dEAG channel is a docking platform for the kinase and that phosphorylation of the channel's kinase recognition sequence modulates the strength of the interaction between the channel and the kinase.

The Drosophila EAG (dEAG) potassium channel is the founding member of the superfamily of KNCH channels, which are involved in cardiac repolarization, neuronal excitability and cellular proliferation. In flies, dEAG is involved in regulation of neuron firing and assembles with CaMKII to form a complex implicated in memory formation. We have characterized the interaction between the kinase domain of CaMKII and a 53-residue fragment of the dEAG channel that includes a canonical CaMKII recognition sequence. Crystal structures together with biochemical/biophysical analysis show a substrate–kinase complex with an unusually tight and extensive interface that appears to be strengthened by phosphorylation of the channel fragment. Electrophysiological recordings show that catalytically active CaMKII is required to observe active dEAG channels. A previously identified phosphorylation site in the recognition sequence is not the substrate for this crucial kinase activity, but rather contributes importantly to the tight interaction of the kinase with the channel. The available data suggest that the dEAG channel is a docking platform for the kinase and that phosphorylation of the channel’s kinase recognition sequence modulates the strength of the interaction between the channel and the kinase.

Beaufour M., Ginguené D., Le Meur R., Castaing B. and Cadene M.   (2018)

Liquid native MALDI Mass Spectrometry for the detection of protein-protein complexes.

Journal of the American Society of Mass Spectrometry (2018) 29 (10)1981-1994
Native mass spectrometry (MS) encompasses methods to keep noncovalent interactions of biomolecular complexes intact in the gas phase throughout the instrument and to measure the mass-to-charge ratios of supramolecular complexes directly in the mass spectrometer. Electrospray ionization (ESI) in nondenaturing conditions is now an established method to characterize noncovalent systems. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI), on the other hand, consumes low quantities of samples and largely tolerates contaminants, making it a priori attractive for native MS. However, so-called native MALDI approaches have so far been based on solid deposits, where the rapid transition of the sample through a solid state can engender the loss of native conformations. Here we present a new method for native MS based on liquid deposits and MALDI ionization, unambiguously detecting intact noncovalent protein complexes by direct desorption from a liquid spot for the first time. To control for aggregation, we worked with HUαβ, a heterodimer that does not spontaneously rearrange into homodimers in solution. Screening through numerous matrix solutions to observe first the monomeric protein, then the dimer complex, we settled on a nondenaturing binary matrix solution composed of acidic and basic organic matrices in glycerol, which is stable in vacuo. The role of temporal and spatial laser irradiation patterns was found to be critical. Both a protein-protein and a protein-ligand complex could be observed free of aggregation. To minimize gas-phase dissociation, source parameters were optimized to achieve a conservation of complexes above 50% for both systems.

Native mass spectrometry (MS) encompasses methods to keep noncovalent interactions of biomolecular complexes intact in the gas phase throughout the instrument and to measure the mass-to-charge ratios of supramolecular complexes directly in the mass spectrometer. Electrospray ionization (ESI) in nondenaturing conditions is now an established method to characterize noncovalent systems. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI), on the other hand, consumes low quantities of samples and largely tolerates contaminants, making it a priori attractive for native MS. However, so-called native MALDI approaches have so far been based on solid deposits, where the rapid transition of the sample through a solid state can engender the loss of native conformations. Here we present a new method for native MS based on liquid deposits and MALDI ionization, unambiguously detecting intact noncovalent protein complexes by direct desorption from a liquid spot for the first time. To control for aggregation, we worked with HUαβ, a heterodimer that does not spontaneously rearrange into homodimers in solution. Screening through numerous matrix solutions to observe first the monomeric protein, then the dimer complex, we settled on a nondenaturing binary matrix solution composed of acidic and basic organic matrices in glycerol, which is stable in vacuo. The role of temporal and spatial laser irradiation patterns was found to be critical. Both a protein-protein and a protein-ligand complex could be observed free of aggregation. To minimize gas-phase dissociation, source parameters were optimized to achieve a conservation of complexes above 50% for both systems.


2016   Références trouvées : 4

Marques-Carvalho M. J., Oppermann J., Muñoz E., Fernandes A. S., Gabant G., Cadene M., Heinemann S. H., Schönherr R. and Morais-Cabral J. H.  (2016)

Molecular insights into the mechanism of calmodulin inhibition of the EAG1 potassium channel

Structure 24 (10) 1742-1754 - doi : 10.1016/j.str.2016.07.020
The human EAG1 potassium channel belongs to the superfamily of KCNH voltage-gated potassium channels that have roles in cardiac repolarization and neuronal excitability. EAG1 is strongly inhibited by Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM) through a mechanism that is not understood. We determined the binding properties of CaM with each one of three previously identified binding sites (BDN, BDC1, and BDC2), analyzed binding to protein stretches that include more than one site, and determined the effect of neighboring globular domains on the binding properties. The determination of the crystal structure of CaM bound to BDC2 shows the channel fragment interacting with only the C lobe of calmodulin and adopting an unusual bent conformation. Based on this structure and on a functional and biochemical analysis of mutants, we propose a model for the mechanism of inhibition whereby the local conformational change induced by CaM binding at BDC2 lies at the basis of channel modulation.

The human EAG1 potassium channel belongs to the superfamily of KCNH voltage-gated p