Partenaires

CNRS


Rechercher


Accueil > Annuaire

Hervouet-Coste Nadège


email

tél : 02.38.25.55.47 - fax : 02.38.25.55.83

Publications

2016   Références trouvées : 1

Mosrin-Huaman C., Hervouet-Coste N. and Rahmouni A. R.  (2016)

Co-transcriptional degradation by the 5’-3’ exonuclease Rat1p mediates quality control of HXK1 mRNP biogenesis in S. cerevisiae

RNA Biology (2016) 13 (6) 582-592 - doi : 10.1080/15476286.2016.1181255
The co-transcriptional biogenesis of export-competent messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) in yeast is under the surveillance of quality control (QC) steps. Aberrant mRNPs resulting from inappropriate or inefficient processing and packaging reactions are detected by the QC system and retained in the nucleus with ensuing elimination of their mRNA component by a mechanism that requires the catalytic activity of Rrp6p, a 3'-5' exonuclease associated with the RNA exosome. In previous studies, we implemented a new experimental approach in which the production of aberrant mRNPs is massively increased upon perturbation of mRNP biogenesis by the RNA-dependent helicase/translocase activity of the bacterial Rho factor expressed in S. cerevisiae. The analyses of a subset of transcripts such as PMA1 led us to substantiate the essential role of Rrp6p in the nuclear mRNP QC and to reveal a functional coordination of the process by Nrd1p. Here, we extended those results by showing that, in contrast to PMA1, Rho-induced aberrant HXK1 mRNPs are targeted for destruction by an Nrd1p- and Rrp6p-independent alternative QC pathway that relies on the 5'-3' exonuclease activity of Rat1p. We show that the degradation of aberrant HXK1 mRNPs by Rat1p occurs co-transcriptionally following decapping by Dcp2p and leads to premature transcription termination. We discuss the possibility that this alternative QC pathway might be linked to the well-known specific features of the HXK1 gene transcription such as its localization at the nuclear periphery and gene loop formation.

The co-transcriptional biogenesis of export-competent messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) in yeast is under the surveillance of quality control (QC) steps. Aberrant mRNPs resulting from inappropriate or inefficient processing and packaging reactions are detected by the QC system and retained in the nucleus with ensuing elimination of their mRNA component by a mechanism that requires the catalytic activity of Rrp6p, a 3’-5’ exonuclease associated with the RNA exosome. In previous studies, we implemented a new experimental approach in which the production of aberrant mRNPs is massively increased upon perturbation of mRNP biogenesis by the RNA-dependent helicase/translocase activity of the bacterial Rho factor expressed in S. cerevisiae. The analyses of a subset of transcripts such as PMA1 led us to substantiate the essential role of Rrp6p in the nuclear mRNP QC and to reveal a functional coordination of the process by Nrd1p. Here, we extended those results by showing that, in contrast to PMA1, Rho-induced aberrant HXK1 mRNPs are targeted for destruction by an Nrd1p- and Rrp6p-independent alternative QC pathway that relies on the 5’-3’ exonuclease activity of Rat1p. We show that the degradation of aberrant HXK1 mRNPs by Rat1p occurs co-transcriptionally following decapping by Dcp2p and leads to premature transcription termination. We discuss the possibility that this alternative QC pathway might be linked to the well-known specific features of the HXK1 gene transcription such as its localization at the nuclear periphery and gene loop formation.


2014   Références trouvées : 1

Mosrin-Huaman, C., Hervouet-Coste, N., Le Dantec, A., Stuparevic, I., Rahmouni, A. R.  (2014)

Bacterial Rho helicase : a new tool to dissect mRNP biogenesis and quality control in yeast

Trends in Cell & Molecular Biology (2014) 9, 79-93 - doi : 10.1128/MCB.00272-09
In eukaryotic cells, the co-transcriptional mRNA processing and packaging reactions that lead to the formation of export competent messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) are under the surveillance of quality control (QC) steps. Aberrant mRNPs resulting from faulty events are detected by the QC apparatus and retained in the nucleus with ensuing elimination of their mRNA component by the RNA degradation machinery. A decade of biochemical and genetic experiments in yeast allowed the identification of the nuclear degradation machinery including the core exosome and its two associated catalytic subunits Rrp6p and Rrp44p, its cofactors Rrp47p and Mpp6p as well as the activator complex TRAMP. Similarly, studies of the THO-Sub2 complex of the mRNP assembly and export apparatus have provided valuable information on the nuclear retention and degradation of a particular class of aberrant mRNPs. However, a unifying mechanism of action underlying the QC process remains elusive. Here, we review the implementation of a new experimental approach whereby the production of aberrant mRNPs is massively increased upon heterologous expression of the bacterial Rho helicase in yeast. Using this methodology, we have shown that the QC process is coordinated by Nrd1p (a component of the early termination complex) whose increased co-transcriptional recruitment promotes the attachment of the 3’-5’ exonuclease Rrp6p along with the co-factors Rrp47p and Mpp6p. Interestingly, we established that Rrp6p functions independently from the core exosome, yet is stimulated by two forms of the TRAMP complex that include Trf4p or Trf5p and Air2p but not Air1p. The results suggest that specific substrates could be primed for decay via various QC pathways owing to the versatility of the mRNA degradation apparatus. In this context, the bacterial Rho helicase provides a valuable tool to decipher the QC molecular process in yeast and possibly the homologous process in mammalian cells.

In eukaryotic cells, the co-transcriptional mRNA processing and packaging reactions that lead to the formation of export competent messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) are under the surveillance of quality control (QC) steps. Aberrant mRNPs resulting from faulty events are detected by the QC apparatus and retained in the nucleus with ensuing elimination of their mRNA component by the RNA degradation machinery. A decade of biochemical and genetic experiments in yeast allowed the identification of the nuclear degradation machinery including the core exosome and its two associated catalytic subunits Rrp6p and Rrp44p, its cofactors Rrp47p and Mpp6p as well as the activator complex TRAMP. Similarly, studies of the THO-Sub2 complex of the mRNP assembly and export apparatus have provided valuable information on the nuclear retention and degradation of a particular class of aberrant mRNPs. However, a unifying mechanism of action underlying the QC process remains elusive. Here, we review the implementation of a new experimental approach whereby the production of aberrant mRNPs is massively increased upon heterologous expression of the bacterial Rho helicase in yeast. Using this methodology, we have shown that the QC process is coordinated by Nrd1p (a component of the early termination complex) whose increased co-transcriptional recruitment promotes the attachment of the 3’-5’ exonuclease Rrp6p along with the co-factors Rrp47p and Mpp6p. Interestingly, we established that Rrp6p functions independently from the core exosome, yet is stimulated by two forms of the TRAMP complex that include Trf4p or Trf5p and Air2p but not Air1p. The results suggest that specific substrates could be primed for decay via various QC pathways owing to the versatility of the mRNA degradation apparatus. In this context, the bacterial Rho helicase provides a valuable tool to decipher the QC molecular process in yeast and possibly the homologous process in mammalian cells.


2013   Références trouvées : 1

Stuparevic, I., Mosrin-Huaman, C., Hervouet-Coste, N., Remenaric, M. and Rahmouni, A. R.  (2013)

Co-transcriptional recruitment of the RNA exosome cofactors Rrp47p, Mpp6p and two distinct TRAMP complexes assists the exonuclease Rrp6p in the targeting and degradation of an aberrant mRNP in yeast

Journal of Biological Chemistry 288 (44) 31816-31829 - doi : 10.1074/jbc.M113.491290
The co-transcriptional mRNA processing and packaging reactions that lead to the formation of export-competent mRNPs are under the surveillance of quality control steps. Aberrant mRNPs resulting from faulty events are retained in the nucleus with ensuing elimination of their mRNA component. The molecular mechanisms by which the surveillance system recognizes defective mRNPs and stimulates their destruction by the RNA degradation machinery are still not completely elucidated. Using an experimental approach in which mRNP formation in yeast is disturbed by the action of the bacterial Rho helicase, we have shown previously that the targeting of Rho-induced aberrant mRNPs is mediated by Rrp6p which is recruited co-transcriptionally in association with Nrd1p following Rho action. Here, we investigated the specific involvement in this quality control process of different cofactors associated with the nuclear RNA degradation machinery. We show that, in addition to the main hydrolytic action of the exonuclease Rrp6p, the cofactors Rrp47p and Mpp6p as well as the TRAMP components Trf4p, Trf5p and Air2p contribute significantly by stimulating the degradation process upon their co-transcriptional recruitment. Trf4p and Trf5p are apparently recruited in two distinct TRAMP complexes that both contain Air2p as component. Surprisingly, Rrp47p appears to play an important role in mutual protein stabilization with Rrp6p which highlights a close association between the two partners. Together, our results provide an integrated view of how different cofactors of the RNA degradation machinery cooperate to target and eliminate aberrant mRNPs.

The co-transcriptional mRNA processing and packaging reactions that lead to the formation of export-competent mRNPs are under the surveillance of quality control steps. Aberrant mRNPs resulting from faulty events are retained in the nucleus with ensuing elimination of their mRNA component. The molecular mechanisms by which the surveillance system recognizes defective mRNPs and stimulates their destruction by the RNA degradation machinery are still not completely elucidated. Using an experimental approach in which mRNP formation in yeast is disturbed by the action of the bacterial Rho helicase, we have shown previously that the targeting of Rho-induced aberrant mRNPs is mediated by Rrp6p which is recruited co-transcriptionally in association with Nrd1p following Rho action. Here, we investigated the specific involvement in this quality control process of different cofactors associated with the nuclear RNA degradation machinery. We show that, in addition to the main hydrolytic action of the exonuclease Rrp6p, the cofactors Rrp47p and Mpp6p as well as the TRAMP components Trf4p, Trf5p and Air2p contribute significantly by stimulating the degradation process upon their co-transcriptional recruitment. Trf4p and Trf5p are apparently recruited in two distinct TRAMP complexes that both contain Air2p as component. Surprisingly, Rrp47p appears to play an important role in mutual protein stabilization with Rrp6p which highlights a close association between the two partners. Together, our results provide an integrated view of how different cofactors of the RNA degradation machinery cooperate to target and eliminate aberrant mRNPs.


2011   Références trouvées : 1

Honorine, R., Mosrin-Huaman, C., Hervouet, N., Libri, D. & Rahmouni, A.R.  (2011)

Nuclear mRNA quality control in yeast is mediated by Nrd1 co-transcriptional recruitment,as revealed by the targeting of Rho-induced aberrant transcripts.

Nucleic Acids Res. 39 (7) 2809-2820
The production of mature export-competent transcripts is under the surveillance of quality control steps where aberrant mRNP molecules resulting from inappropriate or inefficient processing and packaging reactions are subject to exosome-mediated degradation. Previously, we have shown that the heterologous expression of bacterial Rho factor in yeast interferes in normal mRNP biogenesis leading to the production of full-length yet aberrant transcripts that are degraded by the nuclear exosome with ensuing growth defect. Here, we took advantage of this new tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which an integrated system recognizes aberrancies at each step of mRNP biogenesis and targets the defective molecules for destruction. We show that the targeting and degradation of Rho-induced aberrant transcripts is associated with a large increase of Nrd1 recruitment to the transcription complex via its CID and RRM domains and a concomitant enrichment of exosome component Rrp6 association. The targeting and degradation of the aberrant transcripts is suppressed by the overproduction of Pcf11 or its isolated CID domain, through a competition with Nrd1 for recruitment by the transcription complex. Altogether, our results support a model in which a stimulation of Nrd1 co-transcriptional recruitment coordinates the recognition and removal of aberrant transcripts by promoting the attachment of the nuclear mRNA degradation machinery.

The production of mature export-competent transcripts is under the surveillance of quality control steps where aberrant mRNP molecules resulting from inappropriate or inefficient processing and packaging reactions are subject to exosome-mediated degradation. Previously, we have shown that the heterologous expression of bacterial Rho factor in yeast interferes in normal mRNP biogenesis leading to the production of full-length yet aberrant transcripts that are degraded by the nuclear exosome with ensuing growth defect. Here, we took advantage of this new tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which an integrated system recognizes aberrancies at each step of mRNP biogenesis and targets the defective molecules for destruction. We show that the targeting and degradation of Rho-induced aberrant transcripts is associated with a large increase of Nrd1 recruitment to the transcription complex via its CID and RRM domains and a concomitant enrichment of exosome component Rrp6 association. The targeting and degradation of the aberrant transcripts is suppressed by the overproduction of Pcf11 or its isolated CID domain, through a competition with Nrd1 for recruitment by the transcription complex. Altogether, our results support a model in which a stimulation of Nrd1 co-transcriptional recruitment coordinates the recognition and removal of aberrant transcripts by promoting the attachment of the nuclear mRNA degradation machinery.


2009   Références trouvées : 1

Mishima, Y., Coste, F., Bobezeau, V., Hervouet, N., Kellenberger, C. & Roussel, A.  (2009)

Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the N-terminal domain of GNBP3 from Drosophila melanogaster.

Acta Crystallogr. F 65, 870-873.


2008   Références trouvées : 1

Coste, F ; Ober, M ; Le Bihan, YV ; Izquierdo, M ; Hervouet, N ; Mueller, H ; Carell, T ; Castaing, B   (2008)

Bacterial base excision repair enzyme Fpg (MutM) recognizes bulky N7-substituted-FapydG lesion using a novel and unproductive binding mode

Chemistry and Biology 15 (7) 706-717


2007   Références trouvées : 1

Oudin, A ; Mahroug, S ; Courdavault, V ; Hervouet, N ; Zelwer, C ; Rodriguez-Concepcion, M ; St-Pierre, B ; Burlat, V  (2007)

Spatial distribution and hormonal regulation of gene products from methyl erythritol phosphate and monoterpene-secoiridoid pathways in Catharanthus roseus

Plant Molecular Biology 65 (1-2) 13-30
The monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs) from Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) are secondary metabolites of high interest due to their therapeutical values. Secologanin, the monoterpenoid moiety incorporated into MIAs, is derived from the plastidial methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Here, we have cloned a cDNA encoding hydroxymethylbutenyl diphosphate synthase (HDS), a MEP pathway enzyme, and generated antibodies to investigate the distribution of transcripts and protein in MIA-producing aerial tissues. Consistent with our earlier work, transcripts for the genes encoding the so-called early steps in monoterpenoid biosynthesis (ESMB) enzymes (HDS, others MEP pathway enzymes and geraniol 10-hydroxylase) were preferentially co-localized to internal phloem associated parenchyma (IPAP) cells.

The monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs) from Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) are secondary metabolites of high interest due to their therapeutical values. Secologanin, the monoterpenoid moiety incorporated into MIAs, is derived from the plastidial methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Here, we have cloned a cDNA encoding hydroxymethylbutenyl diphosphate synthase (HDS), a MEP pathway enzyme, and generated antibodies to investigate the distribution of transcripts and protein in MIA-producing aerial tissues. Consistent with our earlier work, transcripts for the genes encoding the so-called early steps in monoterpenoid biosynthesis (ESMB) enzymes (HDS, others MEP pathway enzymes and geraniol 10-hydroxylase) were preferentially co-localized to internal phloem associated parenchyma (IPAP) cells.


2005   Références trouvées : 1

Quevillon-Cheruel, S ; Leulliot, N ; Graille, M ; Hervouet, N ; Coste, F ; Benedetti, H ; Zelwer, C ; Janin, J ; Van Tilbeurgh, H  (2005)

Crystal structure of yeast YHR049W/FSH1, a member of the serine hydrolase family

Protein Science 14 (5) 1350-1356
Yhr049w/FSH1 was recently identified in a combined computational and experimental proteomics analysis for the detection of active serine hydrolases in yeast. This analysis suggested that FSH1 might be a serine-type hydrolase belonging to the broad functional alpha beta-hydrolase superfamily. In order to get insight into the molecular function of this gene, it was targeted in our yeast structural genomics project. The crystal structure of the protein confirms that it contains a Ser/His/Asp catalytic triad that is part of a minimal alpha beta-hydrolase fold. The architecture of the putative active site and analogies with other protein structures suggest that FSH1 may be an esterase. This finding was further strengthened by the unexpected presence of a compound covalently bound to the catalytic serine in the active site. Apparently, the enzyme was trapped with a reactive compound during the purification process.

Yhr049w/FSH1 was recently identified in a combined computational and experimental proteomics analysis for the detection of active serine hydrolases in yeast. This analysis suggested that FSH1 might be a serine-type hydrolase belonging to the broad functional alpha beta-hydrolase superfamily. In order to get insight into the molecular function of this gene, it was targeted in our yeast structural genomics project. The crystal structure of the protein confirms that it contains a Ser/His/Asp catalytic triad that is part of a minimal alpha beta-hydrolase fold. The architecture of the putative active site and analogies with other protein structures suggest that FSH1 may be an esterase. This finding was further strengthened by the unexpected presence of a compound covalently bound to the catalytic serine in the active site. Apparently, the enzyme was trapped with a reactive compound during the purification process.


2003   Références trouvées : 1

Ramstein, J ; Hervouet, N ; Coste, F ; Zelwer, C ; Oberto, J ; Castaing, B  (2003)

Evidence of a thermal unfolding dimeric intermediate for the Escherichia coli histone-like HU proteins : Thermodynamics and structure

Journal of Molecular Biology 331 (1) 101-121
The Escherichia coli histone-like HU protein pool is composed of three dimeric forms : two homodimers, EcHUa(2) and EcHUß(2), and a heterodimer, EcHUaß. The relative abundance of these dimeric forms varies during cell growth and in response to environmental changes, suggesting that each dimer plays different physiological roles.

The Escherichia coli histone-like HU protein pool is composed of three dimeric forms : two homodimers, EcHUa(2) and EcHUß(2), and a heterodimer, EcHUaß. The relative abundance of these dimeric forms varies during cell growth and in response to environmental changes, suggesting that each dimer plays different physiological roles.


2002   Références trouvées : 1

de Jesus, KP ; Serre, L ; Hervouet, N ; Bouckson-Castaing, V ; Zelwer, C ; Castaing, B  (2002)

Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of a complex between the Lactococcus lactis Fpg DNA-repair enzyme and an abasic site containing DNA

Acta Crystallographica Section D-Biological Crystallography 58 679-682 Part 4
For protein-DNA complex crystallization, the choice of the DNA fragment is crucial. With the aim of crystallizing the 31 kDa Fpg DNA-repair enzyme bound to DNA, oligonucleotide duplexes varying in length, sequence, end type and nature of the specific DNA target site were used. Crystals of several protein-DNA combinations grew from solutions containing both polyethylene glycol and salt. This systematic crystallization screening followed by optimization of the crystallization conditions by microseeding led to crystals of Fpg bound to a 13 base-pair duplex DNA carrying the 1,3-propanediol abasic site analogue which are suitable for crystallographic analysis. Complete native data sets have been collected to 2.1 Angstrom resolution.

For protein-DNA complex crystallization, the choice of the DNA fragment is crucial. With the aim of crystallizing the 31 kDa Fpg DNA-repair enzyme bound to DNA, oligonucleotide duplexes varying in length, sequence, end type and nature of the specific DNA target site were used. Crystals of several protein-DNA combinations grew from solutions containing both polyethylene glycol and salt. This systematic crystallization screening followed by optimization of the crystallization conditions by microseeding led to crystals of Fpg bound to a 13 base-pair duplex DNA carrying the 1,3-propanediol abasic site analogue which are suitable for crystallographic analysis. Complete native data sets have been collected to 2.1 Angstrom resolution.


2001   Références trouvées : 1

Serre, L ; Verdon, G ; Choinowski, T ; Hervouet, N ; Risler, JL ; Zelwer, C  (2001)

How methionyl-tRNA synthetase creates its amino acid recognition pocket upon L-methionine binding

Journal of Molecular Biology 306 (4) 863-876
Amino acid selection by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases requires efficient mechanisms to avoid incorrect charging of the cognate tRNAs. A proofreading mechanism prevents Escherichia coli methionyl-tRNA synthetase (EcMet-RS) from activating in vivo L-homocysteine, a natural competitor of L-methionine recognised by the enzyme. The crystal structure of the complex between EcMet-RS and L-methionine solved at 1.8 Angstrom resolution exhibits some conspicuous differences with the recently published free enzyme structure. Thus, the methionine delta -sulphur atom replaces a water molecule H-bonded to Leu13N and Tyr260O(eta) in the free enzyme. Rearrangements of aromatic residues enable the protein to form a hydrophobic pocket around the ligand side-chain. The subsequent formation of an extended water molecule network contributes to relative displacements, up to 3 Angstrom, of several domains of the protein. The structure of this complex supports a plausible mechanism for the selection of L-methionine versus L-homocysteine and suggests the possibility of information transfer between the different functional domains of the enzyme. (C) 2001 Academic Press.

Amino acid selection by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases requires efficient mechanisms to avoid incorrect charging of the cognate tRNAs. A proofreading mechanism prevents Escherichia coli methionyl-tRNA synthetase (EcMet-RS) from activating in vivo L-homocysteine, a natural competitor of L-methionine recognised by the enzyme. The crystal structure of the complex between EcMet-RS and L-methionine solved at 1.8 Angstrom resolution exhibits some conspicuous differences with the recently published free enzyme structure. Thus, the methionine delta -sulphur atom replaces a water molecule H-bonded to Leu13N and Tyr260O(eta) in the free enzyme. Rearrangements of aromatic residues enable the protein to form a hydrophobic pocket around the ligand side-chain. The subsequent formation of an extended water molecule network contributes to relative displacements, up to 3 Angstrom, of several domains of the protein. The structure of this complex supports a plausible mechanism for the selection of L-methionine versus L-homocysteine and suggests the possibility of information transfer between the different functional domains of the enzyme. (C) 2001 Academic Press.


1999   Références trouvées : 2

Coste, F ; Hervouet, N ; Oberto, J ; Zelwer, C ; Castaing, B  (1999)

Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the homodimeric form alpha(2) of the HU protein from Escherichia coli

Acta Crystallographica Section D-Biological Crystallography 55 1952-1954 Part 11

Castaing, B ; Fourrey, JL ; Hervouet, N ; Thomas, M ; Boiteux, S ; Zelwer, C  (1999)

AP site structural determinants for Fpg specific recognition

Nucleic Acids Research 27 (2) 608-615
The binding of Escherichia coli and Lactococcus lactis Fapy-DNA glyosylase (Fpg) proteins to DNA containing either cyclic or non-cyclic abasic (AP) site analogs was investigated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and by footprinting experiments. We showed that the reduced AP site is the best substrate analog for the E. coli and L. lactis enzymes (K-Dapp = 0.26 and 0.5 nM, respectively) as compared with the other analogs tested in this study (K-Dapp > 2.8 nM), The 1,3-propanediol (Pr) residue-containing DNA seems to be the minimal AP site structure allowing a Fpg specific DNA binding, since the ethyleneglycol residue is not specifically bound by these enzymes.

The binding of Escherichia coli and Lactococcus lactis Fapy-DNA glyosylase (Fpg) proteins to DNA containing either cyclic or non-cyclic abasic (AP) site analogs was investigated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and by footprinting experiments. We showed that the reduced AP site is the best substrate analog for the E. coli and L. lactis enzymes (K-Dapp = 0.26 and 0.5 nM, respectively) as compared with the other analogs tested in this study (K-Dapp > 2.8 nM), The 1,3-propanediol (Pr) residue-containing DNA seems to be the minimal AP site structure allowing a Fpg specific DNA binding, since the ethyleneglycol residue is not specifically bound by these enzymes.


Mots-clés

Assistant-ingénieur , Biologie de l’ARN et ARN thérapeutiques