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Mollet Lucile


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Publications

2018   Références trouvées : 2

Serrano A., El Haddad S., Moal F., Prazuck T., Legac E., Robin C., Brule F., Charpentier S., Normand T., Legrand A., Hocqueloux L. and Mollet L.  (2018)

Dysregulation of apoptosis and autophagy gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of efficiently treated HIV-infected patients.

Aids (2018) 32 (12) 1579-1587.
Objective : We measure the transcript levels of the proapoptotic GALIG, antiapoptotic MCL1 genes and those of the autophagy genes BECN1, MAP1LC3B, ATG9a, P62/SQSTM1, GABARAP, GABARAPL1 and GABARAPL2 to define if mRNA alteration can characterize HIV-infected patients effectively treated with combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). Design : Monocentric pilot study conducted on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) of 40 uninfected donors and 27 HIV-positive patients effectively treated by cART for at least 8.4 years. Methods : Transcripts of the various genes were quantified by reverse transcription (RT)-quantitative PCR (qPCR) and RT-droplet digital PCR and compared using the standard statistical Mann-Whitney U test and machine learning algorithms. Results : A concomitant overexpression of GALIG and MCL1 is detected in PBMC of effectively cART-treated patients. Overexpression of MAP1LC3B and GABARAPL1 is also measured, whereas BECN1 is underexpressed. Finally, accurate classification (94.5%) of our PBMC samples as HIV-negative donors or HIV-positive cART-treated is obtained in three separate machine-learning algorithms with GABARAPL1 and ATG9a as input variables. Conclusion : cART-treated HIV patients display altered transcript levels for three genes of basal autophagy. Some of these alterations may appear contradictory : BECN1 and ATG9a, both key actors in the formation of mammalian autophagosome, exhibit decreased amount of transcripts, whereas mRNA from the ATG8 family increase. Given the known role of impaired basal autophagy in immune senescence and chronic inflammation, the functional significance of our findings should be explored in larger studies.

Objective : We measure the transcript levels of the proapoptotic GALIG, antiapoptotic MCL1 genes and those of the autophagy genes BECN1, MAP1LC3B, ATG9a, P62/SQSTM1, GABARAP, GABARAPL1 and GABARAPL2 to define if mRNA alteration can characterize HIV-infected patients effectively treated with combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). Design : Monocentric pilot study conducted on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) of 40 uninfected donors and 27 HIV-positive patients effectively treated by cART for at least 8.4 years. Methods : Transcripts of the various genes were quantified by reverse transcription (RT)-quantitative PCR (qPCR) and RT-droplet digital PCR and compared using the standard statistical Mann-Whitney U test and machine learning algorithms. Results : A concomitant overexpression of GALIG and MCL1 is detected in PBMC of effectively cART-treated patients. Overexpression of MAP1LC3B and GABARAPL1 is also measured, whereas BECN1 is underexpressed. Finally, accurate classification (94.5%) of our PBMC samples as HIV-negative donors or HIV-positive cART-treated is obtained in three separate machine-learning algorithms with GABARAPL1 and ATG9a as input variables. Conclusion : cART-treated HIV patients display altered transcript levels for three genes of basal autophagy. Some of these alterations may appear contradictory : BECN1 and ATG9a, both key actors in the formation of mammalian autophagosome, exhibit decreased amount of transcripts, whereas mRNA from the ATG8 family increase. Given the known role of impaired basal autophagy in immune senescence and chronic inflammation, the functional significance of our findings should be explored in larger studies.

El Haddad S., Serrano A., Normand T., Robin C., Dubois M., Brule-Morabito F., Mollet L., Charpentier S. and Legrand A.  (2018)

Interaction of Alpha-synuclein with Cytogaligin, a protein encoded by the proapoptotic gene GALIG.

Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, (2018) 495 (1) 787-792.
GALIG, an internal gene to the human galectin-3 gene, encodes two distinct proteins, Mitogaligin and Cytogaligin through translation of a unique mRNA in two overlapping alternative reading frames. When overexpressed GALIG induces apoptosis. In cultured cells, Mitogaligin destabilizes mitochondria membranes through interaction with cardiolipin. Little is known regarding the role of Cytogaligin. This protein displays multiple subcellular localizations ; cytosol, nucleus, and mitochondria. We illustrate here that Cytogaligin is also secreted in the extracellular medium. Cytogaligin is shown to interact with α-Synuclein, the major component of Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease. Overexpression of Cytogaligin reduces α-Synuclein dimerization raising a possible role in the evolution of α-Synuclein aggregation, a key molecular event underlying the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease.

GALIG, an internal gene to the human galectin-3 gene, encodes two distinct proteins, Mitogaligin and Cytogaligin through translation of a unique mRNA in two overlapping alternative reading frames. When overexpressed GALIG induces apoptosis. In cultured cells, Mitogaligin destabilizes mitochondria membranes through interaction with cardiolipin. Little is known regarding the role of Cytogaligin. This protein displays multiple subcellular localizations ; cytosol, nucleus, and mitochondria. We illustrate here that Cytogaligin is also secreted in the extracellular medium. Cytogaligin is shown to interact with α-Synuclein, the major component of Lewy bodies in Parkinson’s disease. Overexpression of Cytogaligin reduces α-Synuclein dimerization raising a possible role in the evolution of α-Synuclein aggregation, a key molecular event underlying the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease.


2013   Références trouvées : 1

Mollet L., Robinet P., Dubois M., Aurouet A., Normand T., Charpentier S., Sureau A., Grandclement C., Garnache-Ottou F., Deconinck E., Brulé F., Rohrlich P.S. and Legrand A.  (2013)

Opposing Mcl-1, the GALIG proapoptotic gene is upregulated as neutrophils die and underexpressed in Acute Myeloid Leukemia cells

Molecular Immunology 56 (1-2) 123-128
GALIG gene expression induces apoptosis in cultured cells through a pathway still under investigation. It is highly expressed in leukocytes but weakly detectable in bone marrow, suggesting a role in the myeloid lineage homeostasis. We show here that GALIG-induced cell death is counteracted by the overexpression of MCL-1, a pro-survival member of the Bcl2 family. Moreover, during spontaneous neutrophil apoptosis, a substantial increase in GALIG gene expression is observed : GALIG still opposes MCL-1. Finally, in bone marrow and peripheral blood cells from patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia type 2, the level of GALIG transcripts is massively down-regulated when compared to their normal counterparts, while MCL-1 is expressed to the same extent. These data suggest that GALIG could be a key player in the cell death pathway involved in leukocytes homeostasis and myeloid malignancies.

GALIG gene expression induces apoptosis in cultured cells through a pathway still under investigation. It is highly expressed in leukocytes but weakly detectable in bone marrow, suggesting a role in the myeloid lineage homeostasis. We show here that GALIG-induced cell death is counteracted by the overexpression of MCL-1, a pro-survival member of the Bcl2 family. Moreover, during spontaneous neutrophil apoptosis, a substantial increase in GALIG gene expression is observed : GALIG still opposes MCL-1. Finally, in bone marrow and peripheral blood cells from patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia type 2, the level of GALIG transcripts is massively down-regulated when compared to their normal counterparts, while MCL-1 is expressed to the same extent. These data suggest that GALIG could be a key player in the cell death pathway involved in leukocytes homeostasis and myeloid malignancies.


2010   Références trouvées : 1

Robinet, P., Mollet, L., Gonzalez, P., Normand, T., Charpentier, S., Brule, F., Dubois, M. & Legrand, A.  (2010)

The mitogaligin protein is addressed to the nucleus via a non-classical localization signal.

Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 392, 53-57.


2009   Références trouvées : 2

Sennepin, A.D., Charpentier, S., Normand, T., Sarre, C., Legrand, A. & Mollet, L.M.  (2009)

Multiple reprobing of Western blots after inactivation of peroxidase activity by its substrate, hydrogen peroxide.

Anal. Biochem. 393, 129-131.

Gonzalez, P., Robinet, P., Charpentier, S., Mollet, L., Normand, T., Dubois, M. & Legrand, A.  (2009)

Apoptotic activity of a nuclear form of mitogaligin, a cell death protein.

Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 378, 816-820.


2007   Références trouvées : 1

Gonzalez, P ; Duneau, M ; Charpentier, S ; Normand, T ; Mollet, L ; Dubois, M ; Legrand, A  (2007)

Destabilization of membranes containing cardiolipin or its precursors by peptides derived from mitogaligin, a cell death protein

Biochemistry 46 (25) 7374-7382
Galig, a gene embedded within the galectin-3 gene, induces cell death when transfected in human cells. This death is associated with cell shrinkage, nuclei condensation, and aggregation of mitochondria. Galig contains two different overlapping open reading frames encoding two unrelated proteins. Previous observations have shown that one of these proteins, named mitogaligin, binds to mitochondria and promotes the release of cytochrome c. However, the mechanism of action of this cytotoxic protein remains still obscure.

Galig, a gene embedded within the galectin-3 gene, induces cell death when transfected in human cells. This death is associated with cell shrinkage, nuclei condensation, and aggregation of mitochondria. Galig contains two different overlapping open reading frames encoding two unrelated proteins. Previous observations have shown that one of these proteins, named mitogaligin, binds to mitochondria and promotes the release of cytochrome c. However, the mechanism of action of this cytotoxic protein remains still obscure.


2005   Références trouvées : 1

Lorin, C ; Combredet, C ; Labrousse, V ; Mollet, L ; Despres, P ; Tangy, F  (2005)

A paediatric vaccination vector based on live attenuated measles vaccine

Therapie 60 (3) 227-233
Live attenuated RNA viruses make highly efficient vaccines. Among them, measles virus (MV) vaccine has been given to a very large number of children and shown to be highly effective and safe. MV vaccine induces a life-long immunity after a single or two low-dose injections. It is easily produced on a large scale in most countries and can be distributed at low cost. Reversion to pathogenicity has never been observed with this vaccine. Because of all these characteristics, MV vaccine might be a very promising vector to immunise children against both measles and other infectious agents, such as HIV or flaviviruses, in the developing world. In this article, we describe recent data that we obtained showing the capacity of recombinant Schwarz MVs to express proteins from human immunodeficiency or West Nile viruses, and to induce specific immune responses able, in the case of West Nile virus, to protect from an experimental challenge.

Live attenuated RNA viruses make highly efficient vaccines. Among them, measles virus (MV) vaccine has been given to a very large number of children and shown to be highly effective and safe. MV vaccine induces a life-long immunity after a single or two low-dose injections. It is easily produced on a large scale in most countries and can be distributed at low cost. Reversion to pathogenicity has never been observed with this vaccine. Because of all these characteristics, MV vaccine might be a very promising vector to immunise children against both measles and other infectious agents, such as HIV or flaviviruses, in the developing world. In this article, we describe recent data that we obtained showing the capacity of recombinant Schwarz MVs to express proteins from human immunodeficiency or West Nile viruses, and to induce specific immune responses able, in the case of West Nile virus, to protect from an experimental challenge.


2004   Références trouvées : 2

Lorin C, Mollet L, Delebecque F, Combredet C, Hurtrel B, Charneau P, Brahic M & Tangy F.  (2004)

A single injection of recombinant measles virus vaccines expressing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 clade B envelope glycoproteins induces neutralizing antibodies and cellular immune responses to HIV.

Journal of Virology 78 (1) 146-157

Iglesias, C ; Mollet, L ; Courbeyrette, K ; Tangy, F ; Langlade-Demoyen, P ; Lemonnier, F ; Charneau, P  (2004)

Lentiviral vectors as potential tools for therapeutic vaccination against AIDS

Gene Therapy 11 S131-S131 Art No. 24 Suppl. 1


2003   Références trouvées : 1

Combredet, C ; Labrousse, V ; Mollet, L ; Lorin, C ; Delebecque, F ; Hurtrel, B ; McClure, H ; Feinberg, MB ; Brahic, M ; Tangy, F  (2003)

A molecularly cloned Schwarz strain of measles virus vaccine induces strong immune responses in Macaques and transgenic mice

Journal of Virology 77 (21) 11546-11554
Live attenuated RNA viruses make highly efficient vaccines. Among them, measles virus (W) vaccine has been given to a very large number of children and has been shown to be highly efficacious and safe. Therefore, this vaccine might be a very promising vector to immunize children against both measles and other infectious agents, such as human immunodeficiency virus. A vector was previously derived from the Edmonston B strain of MV, a vaccine strain abandoned 25 years ago. Sequence analysis revealed that the genome of this vector diverges from Edmonston B by 10 amino acid substitutions not related to any Edmonston subgroup. Here we describe an infectious cDNA for the Schwarz/Moraten strain, a widely used MV vaccine.

Live attenuated RNA viruses make highly efficient vaccines. Among them, measles virus (W) vaccine has been given to a very large number of children and has been shown to be highly efficacious and safe. Therefore, this vaccine might be a very promising vector to immunize children against both measles and other infectious agents, such as human immunodeficiency virus. A vector was previously derived from the Edmonston B strain of MV, a vaccine strain abandoned 25 years ago. Sequence analysis revealed that the genome of this vector diverges from Edmonston B by 10 amino acid substitutions not related to any Edmonston subgroup. Here we describe an infectious cDNA for the Schwarz/Moraten strain, a widely used MV vaccine.


2000   Références trouvées : 1

Mollet, L ; Li, TS ; Samri, A ; Tournay, C ; Tubiana, R ; Calvez, V ; Debre, P ; Katlama, C ; Autran, B ; RESTIM COMET Study Grp  (2000)

Dynamics of HIV-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes with changes in viral load

Journal of Immunology 165 (3) 1692-1704
The influence of HIV burden variations on the frequencies of Ag-specific CD8(+) T cell responses was evaluated before and during highly active antiretroviral therapy by analyzing the number, diversity, and function of these cells. The frequencies of HLA-A2-restricted CD8+ PBL binding HLA-A2/HIV-epitope tetramers or producing IFN-gamma were below 1%, A panel of 16 CTL epitopes covering 15 HLA class I molecules in 14 patients allowed us to test 3.8 epitopes/patient and to detect 2.2 +/- 1.8 HIV epitope-specific CD8(+) subsets per patient with a median frequency of 0.24% (0.11-4.79%).

The influence of HIV burden variations on the frequencies of Ag-specific CD8(+) T cell responses was evaluated before and during highly active antiretroviral therapy by analyzing the number, diversity, and function of these cells. The frequencies of HLA-A2-restricted CD8+ PBL binding HLA-A2/HIV-epitope tetramers or producing IFN-