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Szeremeta Frédéric


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Ingénieur de recherche

Groupe thématique : Complexes métalliques et IRM

Publications

2016   Références trouvées : 1

He, J. Bonnet, C. S. Eliseeva, S. V. Lacerda, S. Chauvin, T. Retailleau, P. Szeremeta, F. Badet, B. Petoud, S. Tóth, E. and Durand, P.  (2016)

Prototypes of Lanthanide(III) Agents Responsive to Enzymatic Activities in Three Complementary Imaging Modalities : Visible/Near-Infrared Luminescence, PARACEST-, and T-MRI

Journal of the American Chemical Society (2016) 138 (9) 2913-2916 - doi : 10.1021/jacs.5b12084
We report first prototypes of responsive lanthanide(III) complexes that can be monitored independently in three complementary imaging modalities. Through the appropriate choice of lanthanide(III) cations, the same reactive ligand can be used to form complexes providing detection by (i) visible (Tb3+) and near-infrared (Yb3+) luminescence, (ii) PARACEST- (Tb3+, Yb3+), or (iii) T1-weighted (Gd3+) MRI. The use of lanthanide(III) ions of different natures for these imaging modalities induces only a minor change in the structure of complexes that are therefore expected to have a single biodistribution and cytotoxicity.

We report first prototypes of responsive lanthanide(III) complexes that can be monitored independently in three complementary imaging modalities. Through the appropriate choice of lanthanide(III) cations, the same reactive ligand can be used to form complexes providing detection by (i) visible (Tb3+) and near-infrared (Yb3+) luminescence, (ii) PARACEST- (Tb3+, Yb3+), or (iii) T1-weighted (Gd3+) MRI. The use of lanthanide(III) ions of different natures for these imaging modalities induces only a minor change in the structure of complexes that are therefore expected to have a single biodistribution and cytotoxicity.


2015   Références trouvées : 4

Zhang, W. Y. Martinelli J., Mayer F., Bonnet C. S., Szeremeta F. and Djanashvili K.  (2015)

Molecular architecture control in synthesis of spherical Ln-containing nanoparticles

Rsc Advances (2015) 5 (85) 69861-69869 - doi : 10.1039/c5ra09374k
Among the procedures to prepare lanthanide-containing nanoparticles a gap exists in the range between 5 and 40 nm. The miniemulsion technique presented here is intended to fill this discontinuity and offers a facile method that can be applied for the preparation of nanoparticles for various applications, e.g. medical imaging, optics and catalysis. We demonstrate that formation of nanodroplets under emulsion conditions is the key step in the size control of the nanoparticles. The type of surfactant and the nature of the dispersed and continuous phases strongly influence the interfacial activity and, consequently, the size of the final solid particles that result from the subsequent thermal decomposition. Moreover, the choice of the surfactant determines the final elemental composition of the particles, leading to either lanthanide oxides or oxysulfates when using Brij (R) 35 or sodium dodecyl sulfate, respectively. Nanoparticles of holmium and gadolinium were prepared and their applicability as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents is shown.

Among the procedures to prepare lanthanide-containing nanoparticles a gap exists in the range between 5 and 40 nm. The miniemulsion technique presented here is intended to fill this discontinuity and offers a facile method that can be applied for the preparation of nanoparticles for various applications, e.g. medical imaging, optics and catalysis. We demonstrate that formation of nanodroplets under emulsion conditions is the key step in the size control of the nanoparticles. The type of surfactant and the nature of the dispersed and continuous phases strongly influence the interfacial activity and, consequently, the size of the final solid particles that result from the subsequent thermal decomposition. Moreover, the choice of the surfactant determines the final elemental composition of the particles, leading to either lanthanide oxides or oxysulfates when using Brij (R) 35 or sodium dodecyl sulfate, respectively. Nanoparticles of holmium and gadolinium were prepared and their applicability as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents is shown.

Carrouée A., Allard-Vannier E., Même S., Szeremeta F., Beloeil J.-C. and Chourpa I.  (2015)

Sensitive Trimodal Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering-Fluorescence Detection of Cancer Cells with Stable Magneto-Plasmonic Nanoprobes

Analytical Chemistry (2016) 87 (22) 11233-11241 - doi : 10.1021/acs.analchem.5b02419
Novel magneto-plasmonic nanoprobes were designed for multimodal diagnosis of cancer by combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS), and fluorescence emission in the very near infrared (VNIR). A controlled electrostatic assembly of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanopartides (SPIONs), VNIR dye Nile Blue (NB), and biopolymer chitosan (Chi) was used to formulate the AgIONs-Chi nanoprobes. The formulation protocol did not involve organic solvents and was rapid and efficient as confirmed by magnetic sorting. The SERRS response of the nanoprobes was very intense and constant for days. It decreased linearly upon 1000-fold dilution and was still recognizable at 0.1 nM NB concentration. After 30 days of storage, the SERRS loss was less than 30% and the hydrodynamic size of the AgIONs-Chi in PBS remained below 200 nm. The gradual decrease of the ratio SERRS/fluorescence allowed one to monitor the release of the fluorescent molecule upon long-term nanoprobe dissociation. The AgIONs-Chi exhibited 2-fold higher MRI contrast than that of commercially available SPION suspensions. Finally, the nanoprobes were actively uptaken by HeLa cancer cells and ensured trimodal MRI-SERRS-fluorescence detection of 10 itL cell inclusions in cm-sized agarose gels used here as phantom models of microtumors. The above results show that the magneto-plasmonic AgIONs-Chi are promising substrates for SERRS analysis in solution and for multimodal imaging of cancer cells.

Novel magneto-plasmonic nanoprobes were designed for multimodal diagnosis of cancer by combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS), and fluorescence emission in the very near infrared (VNIR). A controlled electrostatic assembly of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanopartides (SPIONs), VNIR dye Nile Blue (NB), and biopolymer chitosan (Chi) was used to formulate the AgIONs-Chi nanoprobes. The formulation protocol did not involve organic solvents and was rapid and efficient as confirmed by magnetic sorting. The SERRS response of the nanoprobes was very intense and constant for days. It decreased linearly upon 1000-fold dilution and was still recognizable at 0.1 nM NB concentration. After 30 days of storage, the SERRS loss was less than 30% and the hydrodynamic size of the AgIONs-Chi in PBS remained below 200 nm. The gradual decrease of the ratio SERRS/fluorescence allowed one to monitor the release of the fluorescent molecule upon long-term nanoprobe dissociation. The AgIONs-Chi exhibited 2-fold higher MRI contrast than that of commercially available SPION suspensions. Finally, the nanoprobes were actively uptaken by HeLa cancer cells and ensured trimodal MRI-SERRS-fluorescence detection of 10 itL cell inclusions in cm-sized agarose gels used here as phantom models of microtumors. The above results show that the magneto-plasmonic AgIONs-Chi are promising substrates for SERRS analysis in solution and for multimodal imaging of cancer cells.

Sarou-Kanian V., Joudiou N., Louat F., Yon M., Szeremeta F., Meme S., Massiot D., Decoville M., Fayon F., Beloeil J.-C.  (2015)

Metabolite localization in living drosophila using High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR

Scientific Reports (2015 5 9872 - doi : 10.1038/srep09872
We have developed new methods enabling in vivo localization and identification of metabolites through their (1)H NMR signatures, in a drosophila. Metabolic profiles in localized regions were obtained using HR-MAS Slice Localized Spectroscopy and Chemical Shift Imaging at high magnetic fields. These methods enabled measurement of metabolite contents in anatomic regions of the fly, demonstrated by a decrease in beta-alanine signals in the thorax of flies showing muscle degeneration.

We have developed new methods enabling in vivo localization and identification of metabolites through their (1)H NMR signatures, in a drosophila. Metabolic profiles in localized regions were obtained using HR-MAS Slice Localized Spectroscopy and Chemical Shift Imaging at high magnetic fields. These methods enabled measurement of metabolite contents in anatomic regions of the fly, demonstrated by a decrease in beta-alanine signals in the thorax of flies showing muscle degeneration.

Oukhatar, F., Même, S., Même, W., Szeremeta, F., Logothetis, N.K., Angelovski, G. and Tóth, E.  (2015)

MRI Sensing of Neurotransmitters with a Crown Ether Appended Gd3+ Complex

ACS Chemical Neuroscience (2015) 6 (2) 219-225 - doi : 10.1021/cn500289y
Molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approaches that detect biomarkers associated with neural activity would allow more direct observation of brain function than current functional MRI based on blood-oxygen-level-dependent contrast. Our objective was to create a synthetic molecular platform with appropriate recognition moieties for zwitterionic neurotransmitters that generate an MR signal change upon neurotransmitter binding. The gadolinium complex (GdL) we report offers ditopic binding for zwitterionic amino acid neurotransmitters, via interactions (i) between the positively charged and coordinatively unsaturated metal center and the carboxylate function and (ii) between a triazacrown ether and the amine group of the neurotransmitters. GdL discriminates zwitterionic neurotransmitters from monoamines. Neurotransmitter binding leads to a remarkable relaxivity change, related to a decrease in hydration number. GdL was successfully used to monitor neural activity in ex vivo mouse brain slices by MRI.

Molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approaches that detect biomarkers associated with neural activity would allow more direct observation of brain function than current functional MRI based on blood-oxygen-level-dependent contrast. Our objective was to create a synthetic molecular platform with appropriate recognition moieties for zwitterionic neurotransmitters that generate an MR signal change upon neurotransmitter binding. The gadolinium complex (GdL) we report offers ditopic binding for zwitterionic amino acid neurotransmitters, via interactions (i) between the positively charged and coordinatively unsaturated metal center and the carboxylate function and (ii) between a triazacrown ether and the amine group of the neurotransmitters. GdL discriminates zwitterionic neurotransmitters from monoamines. Neurotransmitter binding leads to a remarkable relaxivity change, related to a decrease in hydration number. GdL was successfully used to monitor neural activity in ex vivo mouse brain slices by MRI.


2014   Références trouvées : 1

Même S., Joudiou N., Yousfi N., Szeremeta F., Lopes-Pereira P., Beloeil J.C., Herault Y. and Même W.  (2014)

In Vivo 9.4T MRI and 1H MRS for Evaluation of Brain Structural and Metabolic Changes in the Ts65Dn Mouse Model for Down Syndrome

World Journal of Neuroscience (2014) 4, 152-163 - doi : 10.4236/wjns.2014.42018
In the present study we investigated structural and metabolic modifications of the brain in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome(DS)using both in vivo magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy(MRS). MRI was performed for further texture analysis and changes in texture parameters, including mean grey levels, contrast and homogeneity, and they were found in Ts65Dn compared to diploid littermates (2n). These phenotypic changes were different in the hippocampus and cerebellum, since in Ts65Dn mean grey levels increased in the cerebellum and decreased in the hippocampus. In addition, proton NMR spectra revealed differences in metabolite ratios. Levels of N-acetylaspartate(NAA)and glutamate(Glu), were lower compared to total creatine levels (CX), in the Ts65Dn brain. However, the most striking finding was an increase in the concentration of myo-inositol(Ins)and choline(Cho)in the hippocampus, whereas the Ins concentration was reduced in the cerebellum. Overall, these data illustrate that MRI and MRS are valuable assesment tools sufficiently sensitive to detect associated changes in different brain areas, thus providing new insight into the causative role of dosage-sensitive genes in the Ts65Dn DS mouse model.

In the present study we investigated structural and metabolic modifications of the brain in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome(DS)using both in vivo magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy(MRS). MRI was performed for further texture analysis and changes in texture parameters, including mean grey levels, contrast and homogeneity, and they were found in Ts65Dn compared to diploid littermates (2n). These phenotypic changes were different in the hippocampus and cerebellum, since in Ts65Dn mean grey levels increased in the cerebellum and decreased in the hippocampus. In addition, proton NMR spectra revealed differences in metabolite ratios. Levels of N-acetylaspartate(NAA)and glutamate(Glu), were lower compared to total creatine levels (CX), in the Ts65Dn brain. However, the most striking finding was an increase in the concentration of myo-inositol(Ins)and choline(Cho)in the hippocampus, whereas the Ins concentration was reduced in the cerebellum. Overall, these data illustrate that MRI and MRS are valuable assesment tools sufficiently sensitive to detect associated changes in different brain areas, thus providing new insight into the causative role of dosage-sensitive genes in the Ts65Dn DS mouse model.


2013   Références trouvées : 3

Teng F., Beray-Berthat V., Coqueran B., Lesbats C., Kuntz M., Palmier B., Garraud M., Bedfert C., Slane N., Berezowski V., Szeremeta F., Hachani J., Scherman D., Plotkine M., Doan B. T., Marchand-Leroux C. and Margaill I.  (2013)

Prevention of rt-PA induced blood-brain barrier component degradation by the poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase inhibitor PJ34 after ischemic stroke in mice

Experimental neurology (2013) 248, 416-428 - doi : 10.1016/j.expneurol.2013.07.007
Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is the only pharmacological treatment approved for thrombolysis in patients suffering from ischemic stroke, but its administration aggravates the risk of hemorrhagic transformations. Experimental data demonstrated that rt-PA increases the activity of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether PJ34, a potent (PARP) inhibitor, protects the blood-brain barrier components from rt-PA toxicity. In our mouse model of cerebral ischemia, administration of rt-PA (10 mg/kg, i.v.) 6h after ischemia aggravated the post-ischemic degradation of ZO-1, claudin-5 and VE-cadherin, increased the hemorrhagic transformations (assessed by brain hemoglobin content and magnetic resonance imaging). Furthermore, rt-PA also aggravated ischemia-induced functional deficits. Combining PJ34 with rt-PA preserved the expression of ZO-1, claudin-5 and VE-cadherin, reduced the hemorrhagic transformations and improved the sensorimotor performances. In vitro studies also demonstrated that PJ34 crosses the blood-brain barrier and may thus exert its protective effect by acting on endothelial and/or parenchymal cells. Thus, co-treatment with a PARP inhibitor seems to be a promising strategy to reduce rt-PA-induced vascular toxicity after stroke.

Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is the only pharmacological treatment approved for thrombolysis in patients suffering from ischemic stroke, but its administration aggravates the risk of hemorrhagic transformations. Experimental data demonstrated that rt-PA increases the activity of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether PJ34, a potent (PARP) inhibitor, protects the blood-brain barrier components from rt-PA toxicity. In our mouse model of cerebral ischemia, administration of rt-PA (10 mg/kg, i.v.) 6h after ischemia aggravated the post-ischemic degradation of ZO-1, claudin-5 and VE-cadherin, increased the hemorrhagic transformations (assessed by brain hemoglobin content and magnetic resonance imaging). Furthermore, rt-PA also aggravated ischemia-induced functional deficits. Combining PJ34 with rt-PA preserved the expression of ZO-1, claudin-5 and VE-cadherin, reduced the hemorrhagic transformations and improved the sensorimotor performances. In vitro studies also demonstrated that PJ34 crosses the blood-brain barrier and may thus exert its protective effect by acting on endothelial and/or parenchymal cells. Thus, co-treatment with a PARP inhibitor seems to be a promising strategy to reduce rt-PA-induced vascular toxicity after stroke.

Palomo J., Fauconnier M., Coquard L., Gilles M., Meme S., Szeremeta F., Fick L., Franetich J.F., Jacobs M., Togbe D., Beloeil J.C., Mazier D., Ryffel B. and Quesniaux V.F.  (2013)

Type I interferons contribute to experimental cerebral malaria development in response to sporozoite or blood-stage Plasmodium berghei ANKA

European Journal of Immunology 43 (10) 2683-2695 - doi : 10.1002/eji.201343327
Cerebral malaria is a severe complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection. Although T-cell activation and type II IFN-gamma are required for Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA)-induced murine experimental cerebral malaria (ECM), the role of type I IFN-alpha/beta in ECM development remains unclear. Here, we address the role of the IFN-alpha/beta pathway in ECM devel-opment in response to hepatic or blood-stage PbA infection, using mice deficient for types I or II IFN receptors. While IFN-gammaR1(-)/(-) mice were fully resistant, IFNAR1(-)/(-) mice showed delayed and partial protection to ECM after PbA infection. ECM resistance in IFN-gammaR1(-)/(-) mice correlated with unaltered cerebral microcirculation and absence of ischemia, while WT and IFNAR1(-)/(-) mice developed distinct microvascular pathologies. ECM resistance appeared to be independent of parasitemia. Instead, key mediators of ECM were attenuated in the absence of IFNAR1, including PbA-induced brain sequestration of CXCR3(+)-activated CD8(+) T cells. This was associated with reduced expression of Granzyme B, IFN-gamma, IL-12Rbeta2, and T-cell-attracting chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 in IFNAR1(-)/(-) mice, more so in the absence of IFN-gammaR1. Therefore, the type I IFN-alpha/beta receptor pathway contributes to brain T-cell responses and microvascular pathology, although it is not as essential as IFN-gamma for the development of cerebral malaria upon hepatic or blood-stage PbA infection.

Cerebral malaria is a severe complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection. Although T-cell activation and type II IFN-gamma are required for Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA)-induced murine experimental cerebral malaria (ECM), the role of type I IFN-alpha/beta in ECM development remains unclear. Here, we address the role of the IFN-alpha/beta pathway in ECM devel-opment in response to hepatic or blood-stage PbA infection, using mice deficient for types I or II IFN receptors. While IFN-gammaR1(-)/(-) mice were fully resistant, IFNAR1(-)/(-) mice showed delayed and partial protection to ECM after PbA infection. ECM resistance in IFN-gammaR1(-)/(-) mice correlated with unaltered cerebral microcirculation and absence of ischemia, while WT and IFNAR1(-)/(-) mice developed distinct microvascular pathologies. ECM resistance appeared to be independent of parasitemia. Instead, key mediators of ECM were attenuated in the absence of IFNAR1, including PbA-induced brain sequestration of CXCR3(+)-activated CD8(+) T cells. This was associated with reduced expression of Granzyme B, IFN-gamma, IL-12Rbeta2, and T-cell-attracting chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 in IFNAR1(-)/(-) mice, more so in the absence of IFN-gammaR1. Therefore, the type I IFN-alpha/beta receptor pathway contributes to brain T-cell responses and microvascular pathology, although it is not as essential as IFN-gamma for the development of cerebral malaria upon hepatic or blood-stage PbA infection.

Même, S., Joudiou, N., Szeremeta, F., Mispelter, J., Louat, F., Decoville, M., Locker, D., Beloeil, J-C.  (2013)

In vivo magnetic resonance microscopy of Drosophilae at 9.4 T

Magnetic Resonance Imaging 31 (1) 109-119 - doi : 10.1016/j.mri.2012.06.019
In preclinical research, genetic studies have made considerable progress as a result of the development of transgenic animal models of human diseases. Consequently, there is now a need for higher resolution MRI to provide finer details for studies of small animals (rats, mice) or very small animals (insects). One way to address this issue is to work with high-magnetic-field spectrometers (dedicated to small animal imaging) with strong magnetic field gradients. It is also necessary to develop a complete methodology (transmit/receive coil, pulse sequence, fixing system, air supply, anesthesia capabilities, etc.). In this study, we developed noninvasive protocols, both in vitro and in vivo (from coil construction to image generation), for drosophila MRI at 9.4 T. The 10*10*80-μm resolution makes it possible to visualize whole drosophila (head, thorax, abdomen) and internal organs (ovaries, longitudinal and transverse muscles, bowel, proboscis, antennae and optical lobes). We also provide some results obtained with a Drosophila model of muscle degeneration. This opens the way for new applications of structural genetic modification studies using MRI of drosophila.

In preclinical research, genetic studies have made considerable progress as a result of the development of transgenic animal models of human diseases. Consequently, there is now a need for higher resolution MRI to provide finer details for studies of small animals (rats, mice) or very small animals (insects). One way to address this issue is to work with high-magnetic-field spectrometers (dedicated to small animal imaging) with strong magnetic field gradients. It is also necessary to develop a complete methodology (transmit/receive coil, pulse sequence, fixing system, air supply, anesthesia capabilities, etc.). In this study, we developed noninvasive protocols, both in vitro and in vivo (from coil construction to image generation), for drosophila MRI at 9.4 T. The 10*10*80-μm resolution makes it possible to visualize whole drosophila (head, thorax, abdomen) and internal organs (ovaries, longitudinal and transverse muscles, bowel, proboscis, antennae and optical lobes). We also provide some results obtained with a Drosophila model of muscle degeneration. This opens the way for new applications of structural genetic modification studies using MRI of drosophila.


2012   Références trouvées : 1

Fauconnier, M., Palomo, J., Bourigault, M. L., Meme, S., Szeremeta, F., Beloeil, J. C., Danneels, A., Charron, S., Rihet, P., Ryffel, B. and Quesniaux, V. F. J.  (2012)

IL-12R beta 2 Is Essential for the Development of Experimental Cerebral Malaria

The Journal of Immunology 188 (4) 1905-1914
A Th1 response is required for the development of Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA)-induced experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). The role of pro-Th1 IL-12 in malaria is complex and controversial. In this study, we addressed the role of IL-12R beta 2 in ECM development. C57BL/6 mice deficient for IL-12R beta 2, IL-12p40, or IL-12p35 were analyzed for ECM development after blood-stage PbA infection in terms of ischemia and blood flow by noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging and angiography, T cell recruitment, and gene expression. Without IL-12R beta 2, no neurologic sign of ECM developed upon PbA infection. Although wildtype mice developed distinct brain microvascular pathology, ECM-resistant, IL-12R beta 2-deficient mice showed unaltered cerebral microcirculation and the absence of ischemia after PbA infection. In contrast, mice deficient for IL-12p40 or IL-12p35 were sensitive to ECM development. The resistance of IL-12R beta 2-deficient mice to ECM correlated with reduced recruitment of activated T cells and impaired overexpression of lymphotoxin-alpha, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma in the brain after PbA infection. Therefore, IL-12R beta 2 signaling is essential for ECM development but independent from IL-12p40 and IL-12p35. We document a novel link between IL-12R beta 2 and lymphotoxin-alpha, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma expression, key cytokines for ECM pathogenesis.

A Th1 response is required for the development of Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA)-induced experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). The role of pro-Th1 IL-12 in malaria is complex and controversial. In this study, we addressed the role of IL-12R beta 2 in ECM development. C57BL/6 mice deficient for IL-12R beta 2, IL-12p40, or IL-12p35 were analyzed for ECM development after blood-stage PbA infection in terms of ischemia and blood flow by noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging and angiography, T cell recruitment, and gene expression. Without IL-12R beta 2, no neurologic sign of ECM developed upon PbA infection. Although wildtype mice developed distinct brain microvascular pathology, ECM-resistant, IL-12R beta 2-deficient mice showed unaltered cerebral microcirculation and the absence of ischemia after PbA infection. In contrast, mice deficient for IL-12p40 or IL-12p35 were sensitive to ECM development. The resistance of IL-12R beta 2-deficient mice to ECM correlated with reduced recruitment of activated T cells and impaired overexpression of lymphotoxin-alpha, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma in the brain after PbA infection. Therefore, IL-12R beta 2 signaling is essential for ECM development but independent from IL-12p40 and IL-12p35. We document a novel link between IL-12R beta 2 and lymphotoxin-alpha, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma expression, key cytokines for ECM pathogenesis.


2011   Références trouvées : 1

Fauconnier, M. Bourigault, M. L. Meme, S. Szeremeta, F. Palomo, J. Danneels, A. Charron, S. Fick, L. Jacobs, M. Beloeil, J. C. Ryffe, B. & Quesniaux, V. F. J.  (2011)

Protein Kinase C-Theta Is Required for Development of Experimental Cerebral Malaria

American Journal of Pathology - 178 (1) 212-221


2009   Références trouvées : 1

Doan, B.T., Autret, G., Mispelter, J., Meric, P., Meme, W., Montecot-Dubourg, C., Correze, J.L., Szeremeta, F., Gillet, B. & Beloeil, J.C.  (2009)

Simultaneous two-voxel localized H-1-observed C-13-edited spectroscopy for in vivo MRS on rat brain at 9.4 T : Application to the investigation of excitotoxic lesions.

J. Magn. Reson. 198, 94-104.


2008   Références trouvées : 1

Noury, F ; Mispelter, J ; Szeremeta, F ; Même, S ; Doan, BT ; Beloeil, JC   (2008)

MRI methodological development of intervertebral disc degeneration : a rabbit in vivo study at 9.4 T

Magn. Reson. Imaging 26 (10) 1421-1432